Sights

The front and rear sights for a weapon of this type may range from a crude front post and fixed open rear sight to the precision, fully adjustable sights illustrated in the drawings and pictures. If desired, the front sight may be adjusted for horizontal movement by sliding it in the opposite direction to the desired point of impact. Vertical adjustment may then be made by raising or lowering the rear sight. However, since it would require a hammer and punch or similar tools to move the front sight, it would be better to make a rear sight, fully adjustable for both elevation and windage.

If available, the rear sight assembly from a United States 03A4 rifle, or similar rifle, can be used. It should be fitted as close to the rear of the receiver as possible, by making a mounting bracket and brazing or screwing it in place, in the center of the top of the rear receiver.

A satisfactory front sight can be obtained by sawing the lower part of the barrel band from the front sight of an old World War I or II military rifle. File the bottom to the same radius as the receiver and fasten it in place by brazing, or with screws, or through a combination of both.

In the eyent that these sights are not available, it will be necessary to make a set from scratch, with sheet metal as I illustrated with the other parts. The front sight may be made from sheet metal in one of two ways; by filing or milling from a solid block, or by welding separate sections together. I personally believe that a front sight, filed from a solid block with an integral protective ear on each side of the sight blade, will prove to be sturdier, and therefore the most dependable. It should be fastened to the receiver with two screws and silver solder.

File one side of a block of steel, three-fourths inch square, to the same radius as the receiver body. This will be the bottom of the sight. Turn it over and lay out military MiüSffi

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Band Saw Blades One Sixteenth Inch Thick

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1/6" FALSt BASK

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Left: Rear and front sigh! in place.Rear is from U.S. 03A3 rifle with adapter plate. Front is from 98 Mauser.

Below: Top view showing front and rear sights in place.

four lines along the top. Two will act as guide lines to mark a one-eighth inch blade in the middle of the sight body. Lay these out, one-sixteenth inch on each side of, and parallel to, the center line. The other two lines should be made on each side, one-eighth inch inside the outside edge. Now, with a series or parallel saw cuts, finished with a file or with file cuts only, remove the metal between the blade in the middle and the outside walls to a depth of three-eighths inch.

The center blade can be filed to an inverted "V" shape, with the top left square, rounded, or filed to whatever shape you desire. The outside walls should be beveled or rounded toward the top, and flared slightly outward by beveling. These outer walls serve only to protect the sight blade. They should be rounded at the front and rear corners to create a better appearance and to prevent the sight from catching on clothing.

The rear sight is a little more complicated. Since I feel that adjustment for both windage and elevation is mandatory, this is the type I will illustrate. If you think you can get by with less, then it is a simple matter to form a fixed rear sight by bending sheet metal to shape and fastening it to the top rear of the receiver.

The rear sight shown here is quite similar to the U.S. 03A3 rear sight. It is very sturdy because the outside walls guard the sight proper. The main body may be bent to shape from one-eighth inch sheet stock. Another piece must then be used on the bottom as a fillet between the bottom of the sight and the curved surface of the receiver.

If this method is used, cut a strip seven-eighths inch wide by three inches long, and bend it around a three-fourths inch wide block of steel to form a square "U" shaped box. The sides should be shaped as shown in the drawing. The bottom fillet must be cut to approximately the same shape as the bottom of this sight body and filed to the radius of the receiver body. This will be "sandwiched" between the sight and receiver to make a close fitting installation.

Another,method, probably better in the long run, would be to make a bottom section from one-fourth inch thick stock, three-fourths inch wide and seven-eighths inch long. The bottom radius should fit the receiver and an outside wall of one-eighth inch sheet, that should be welded or brazed to each side of the bottom section.

After, the rear sight is properly shaped, through either method, a .166 inch hole should be drilled through the sides with a Number 19 drill, on a spot midway between the front and rear and one-eighth inch above the inside bottom edge. The windage adjustment screw goes in this hole.

Drawings Submachine Guns

Left: Front view ot receiver-Note protective ears on each side of front sight. Above: Top view of receiver.

The sight elevation and mounting block is made from a block of steel one-half inch by one-half inch by seven-eighths inch, as shown in the drawing. It may be formed completely with files. However, a small, flat pillar file is necessary to cut the slot in each side. If one is not available, slowly and carefully grind the back side of a hacksaw blade until it is narrow enough to fit between the sides of the sight block, and then cut the slots with it. Be careful not to get the saw blade hot enough to affect its heat treatment while grinding it narrow.

Drill a corresponding hole through the sight block crosswise to receive the windage screw. This hole should be drilled with a Number 29 drill and tapped with an eight by forty, or whatever thread pitch fits your screw. Drill another hole from the bottom side in the center, close to the rear of the sight block, to house a small coil spring. This serves to keep looseness or play to a minimum between the block and sight body.

A Number 8 steel screw, one and one-fourth inch long, is used as a windage screw. Turn the head down until only a small flange remains. This flange should be countersunk slightly into the sight body. Make a knob to screw on the projecting end of the screw with a lock screw to secure it to the windage screw. The outer rim of this knob should be knurled if possible. A small spring, made as shown, will keep tension on the wind-* age screw.

The rear sight itself is made by bending a three-eighths inch wide strip of one-eighth inch flat stock to an "L" shape. The sight aperture may be drilled with whatever size drill you desire. I recommend a one-eighth inch aperture.

The flange on each side of the sight should closely fit the slots in the sight body. Also, a keeper, or retainer, made from flat spring stock, should be fastened to the top of the sight with a screw. The outer edges of this retainer will engage the shallow notches in the sight block preventing accidental movement of the elevation setting.

I have' purposely avoided mentioning any click values, wherein one click or partial turn of the windage knob (or fore and aft movement of the elevation slide) would equal so much at a given range. There are too many variables to consider to make this practical. The distance between the front and rear sight, the number of threads per inch on the windage screw, and the angle of the elevation slide would all have to be exact to accurately predict this. Therefore, you must practice shooting your gun, moving the sights until they are in line with the same point that the bullet strikes, at whatever range you choose.

FRONT SIGHT SCKEW OK SILVffl SOLDER (OR BOTH) IN PLAC8

Homemade Front Sights

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