Table Of Contents

USEFUL INFORMATION 4

WEAPONLIGHTS FOR HANDGUNS 7

WEAPONLIGHTS FOR SHOULDER

FIRED WEAPONS 13

REPLACEMENT FOREND WEAPONLIGHTS

FOR SHOTGUNS 14

REPLACEMENT FOREND WEAPONLIGHTS

FOR RIFLES, CARBINES & SMGs 19

REPLACEMENT FOREND WITH

PICATINNY MOUNTING RAILS 29

RAIL MOUNTED VERTICAL GRIP

WEAPONLIGHTS 30

RAIL MOUNTED MILLENNIUM UNIVERSAL

WEAPONLIGHTS 34

PRESELECTED MODULAR WEAPONLIGHT

SYSTEMS 42

CUSTOM BUILD YOUR OWN MODULAR

WEAPONLIGHT SYSTEMS 48

LASER SIGHTS 54

BEAMFILTERS & PROTECTIVE COVERS 56

LAMP ASSEMBLY GUIDE 57

HOLSTERS 58

SUREFIRE LITHIUM BATTERIES 59

TACTICAL FLASHLIGHTS 60

SUREFIRE INSTITUTE TRAINING 61

WEAPONLIGHT INDEX BY WEAPON 62

SureFire WeaponLights come in many styles, versions, and models. Additionally, there are switch options, various lamp assemblies, different filters, three kinds of laser modules, and a myriad of power alternatives— literally hundreds of permutations. When you are offered so many choices and options, it isn't always easy to choose, particularly when there are trade-offs and compromises to be made, as is always the case when dealing with light.

To assist you in the WeaponLight selection process, we would like to share with you some of our ideas, observations, and experiences on how to prepare for armed encounters in low light.

First things first— if you have any doubts about the validity of mounting a light on your firearm, put them to rest. If you operate in low-light, you will need to supply light. The brighter the better.

And if you have a firearm in your hands, the most practical way to illuminate the area while simultaneously manipulating or shooting your weapon is to have your light mounted on your gun. This provides "hands free" use of the light, leaving your hands on your gun— finger off the trigger, of course.

So let us begin with a digression. Just because you have a WeaponLight on your firearm doesn't mean you don't need a SureFire hand-held flashlight. A double-negative, but the point is still valid— you need a hand-held light too. The flashlight allows you to illuminate things you wouldn't want to cover with your muzzle, such as a non-combatant, as well as well as provide you with backup illumination and the ability to project your light from angles difficult to achieve with a weapon-mounted light.

So always carry a suitable backup light, such as an M3 CombatLight® from SureFire's Special Operations Series. Some of the parts are interchangeable with those from some of our WeaponLights, a significant tactical advantage.

Now, back to looking at WeaponLights and why you need one. A tactical illumination tool has two purposes. The first is the obvious one, to allow you to see what needs to be seen in the darkness. The second— which generally requires more light power and intensity than the first— is to disable an adversary temporarily by taking away his ability to see. Blind him with the light.

The value and validity of using light to disorient and overwhelm an adversary is really brought home in low-light, force-on-force training. It is here, "in the environment" as we say at the SureFire Institute, that using tactical light against real human opponents, men with guns who are trying their best to shoot you, shows clearly the tactical edge that a SureFire WeaponLight gives you.

Several principles have emerged from the Institute's force-on-force training. Perhaps the most important of them all is the concept of using intermittent light, and moving after the light is triggered. We call this "light and move." Use your light sporadically, randomly, flashing it on and off as you search. After you release the switch, move. This is simply a common sense approach to making yourself less of a target than if you wandered around with your light constantly on, like a walking lighthouse.

The "light and move" principle— we would go so far as to call it an imperative— is what governs the design of most of switches on SureFire flashlights and WeaponLights. We call them momentary switches. Activated by modest pressure, either finger or thumb, the momentary switches permit you to activate your light quickly, on-off-on-off, as you hunt your foe.

But there are more choices than just the switch. When you set about configuring your WeaponLights for your firearms, you must also select the power, intensity and run-time of the light as well as how and where the WeaponLight mounts to your firearm. Size, weight, and cost are also things you need to consider.

If it is not apparent by now, you will soon see that many of the choices and options in a WeaponLight are interrelated; tradeoffs and compromises need to be made. Generally speaking, the more capable systems are bigger, heavier, and more costly. But the modular nature of SureFire WeaponLights allows you to make the trade-offs that best meet your needs, and have the best possible WeaponLight for your specific needs.

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