Charging Priming The System Gauge Shotgun

The System 1™ - 12 Gauge muzzleloading shotgun features an internal (screw-in) choke tube. Improved Cylinder, Modified, and Full Choke tubes are available as accessory items.

Never attempt to install a choke tube or remove a choke tube from a loaded firearm. Always ensure that the firearm is UNLOADED. FAILURE TO HEED THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN AN ACCIDENTAL DISCHARGE CAUSING INJURY AND/OR DEATH TO THE SHOOTER OR BYSTANDERS AND DAMAGE TO PROPERTY.

1. Never fire your Thompson/Center Shotgun, which has been designed to accept internal choke tubes, WITHOUT A CHOKE TUBE INSTALLED. This will result in damage to the threads in the barrel and could render your shotgun inoperable with regards to using the internal screw-in choke tubes.

2. The threads of your T/C choke tubes should be kept clean and lightly lubed at all times. When installing the choke tube into the barrel, make sure the muzzle is pointed away from you, in a safe direction, and never "force" the choke tube into the barrel. If the tube does not screw-in easily, the threads in the barrel or tube could be clogged, or you could be cross-threading the parts. The choke tube should screw in easily by hand. Use the wrench provided to tighten it until snug, but DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN IT AS IT COULD DAMAGE THE TUBE.

3. (See Choke diagram) Wrench shown engaging slots in choke tube. To insert, turn clockwise. To remove, turn counter clockwise.

4. Thompson/Center's screw-in choke tubes are marked IMP CYL, MOD, or FULL. The MOD and IMP CYL tubes can be used with steel shot without damage to the barrel or choke tube. THE FULL CHOKE TUBE SHOULD NOT BE USED WITH STEEL SHOT. These tubes are intended for use in Thompson/Center shotguns ONLY and should not be used in other brands of guns.

Never attempt to use any other choke tube in a Thompson/Center shotgun. MISMATCHING CHOKE TUBES IN ANY SHOTGUN COULD RESULT IN DAMAGE TO THE SHOTGUN, OR SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH TO THE SHOOTER AND/OR BYSTANDER.

If you have any questions concerning installation of your choke tube, contact Thompson/Center's Repair Department or call: Thompson/Center Arms, P.O. Box 5002, Farmington Road, Rochester, New Hampshire 03867, Phone (603-332-2333).

When charging your T/C System 1™ Muzzleloading Shotgun with the internal choke tube, you should only use T/C's woven wool pre-lubricated Natural Wad. These wads have a "memory" and will expand after being pushed through the restrictive choke tube - so they will hold the shot column against the powder charge.

The photo on page 66 shows a shooter in the process of loading a muzzle-loading shotgun. Study this photo carefully and read all of the captions before you proceed to charge your shotgun.

Before charging, insert the ramrod into the barrel and tap it up and down several times. You will hear the metal cap of the ramrod "clink" as it contacts the steel face of the breech plug. Note exactly how far the ramrod extends beyond the muzzle when the barrel is uncharged. Commit this exercise to memory and practice it every time that you handle a muzzleloading firearm. Before you attempt to load it, store it away, hand it to another person, or leave it unattended, always check to ensure that the firearm is uncharged.

The next precharging exercise is to wipe the bore free of all oil. Be meticulous with your cleaning, for the presence of any amount of oil in the barrel or chamber can dampen the powder charge and cause the gun to misfire or hangfire. Point the muzzle in a safe direction and snap several No.11 percussion caps on the nipple before charging. This will ensure ignition by clearing away any oil that may have accumulated in the nipple vent. Set the hammer in half-cock position and your gun is now ready to be charged.

The entire shot & wad column MUST

be seated firmly against the powder charge.

|Powder|

Over The Shot V'Natural" Wads

} Two Over The Powder "Natural" Wads

Breech Cut-a-way

See the specific load recommendations on page 75 of this manual.

The steps in charging the cylinder bore models are as follows:

Step 1: Pour a measured charge of FFG Black Powder (or "RS" Pyrodex) into the barrel.

Step 2: Seat two T/C Natural Wads firmly against the powder charge. Step 3: Pour a measured shot charge into the barrel.

Step 4: Seat one T/C Natural Wad)firmly against the shot charge. See illustration.

Care must be taken to install your choke tube correctly and maintain the choke tube - in order to ensure the proper functioning of the tube.

Once again, the photo on page 66 shows a shooter in the process of loading a muzzleloading shotgun. Study this photo carefully and read all of the captions before you proceed to charge your shotgun.

or two T/C Natural Wads (placed together as one) over

Start the wad or wads into the muzzle with your fingers

Push the wad or wads down

Use one T/C 1/2" fiber wad flush with the muzzle.

the powder charge.

as pictured.

PHOTO B

The entire shot & wad column MUST

be seated firmly against the powder charge.

PHOTO C Hold the ramrod short (as pictured) and push the wad down (about 4") into the barrel.

The entire shot & wad column MUST

be seated firmly against the powder charge.

I One I Over The Shot d} "Natural" n Wads

Powdegl mm

Powder "Natural" Wads

PHOTO D Using short strokes, push the wad slowly down the barrel, allowing time for trapped air to bleed off.

When charging your T/C Muzzleloading Shotgun, adjust your powder measure to the desired charge and fill it with FFG Black Powder ( or RS Pyrodex). To achieve accuracy and uniform patterns, consistency in the powder charge is required. Fill the measure exactly the same each time. The use of the Part #7040 T/C Measure is recommended because it will measure both the powder and shot in the increments specified in our data section.

Pour the measured powder charge down the barrel and strike the side of the barrel several sharp raps with the heel of your hand to settle the powder in the chamber area.

Start the over powder wad or wads into the muzzle as shown in photo "B". (When using two Natural Wads, put them together and insert them together "as one wad"). Once the wad or wads are started, it will move easily down the barrel. Holding the ramrod about 4" up from the bottom, push the wad or wads down the barrel as shown in photo "C". Then, using short strokes of the

1 Two Over The

^Breedi ramrod, slowly push the wad or wads the remainder of the way down the barrel until it contacts and bears firmly against the powder charge. Bear in mind that air is trapped underneath the wad or wads as you load it so you must push slowly...allowing time for this trapped air to bleed off around the wad or wads. See photo "D".

Use your graduated powder measure to measure your shot charge (see information contained in the loading data). Measure your shot as carefully as you measure your powder. Pour your shot charge down the barrel and start your Thompson/Center Natural Wad into the muzzle with your fingers. Load this "over shot wad" with the same care you used in seating your "over powder wad". Allow time for trapped air to bleed off and seat the wad firmly against the shot charge. See photo "E".

Once the shotgun is charged (wads and shot column firmly seated against the powder charge as shown in the illustrated insert Photo "E"), it is necessary to carefully mark your ramrod at the muzzle. A reference mark on the ramrod will ensure that all future charges are seated properly. See Photo "F". Remove the ramrod before priming the firearm.

The entire shot & wad

A

Over The Shot

be seated firmly against the powder charge.

["Natural" Wads

Over The Powder

Powder

Breech

"Natural" Wads

PHOTO E Load over the shot wad(s) slowly to force trapped air out of the barrel.

PHOTO F

Mark the ramrod at the muzzle. Use a marking pencil to mark the ramrod. This will allow you to ensure that each charge is seated to the same depth. Erase and remark each time you adjust the charge or change shot charges. When you arrive at the desired charge, cut a clean notch in the ramrod so you will have a permanent reference mark. This reference mark will serve as an indicator only with the powder and shot charge used when it was marked. When the powder charge and/or shot charge change, the reference mark will also change.

Never fire a muzzleloading shotgun unless you are sure that the entire wad and shot column is properly seated firmly against the powder charge and the ramrod has been removed from the bore. Shooters should bear in mind that the muzzleloading charge is not crimped into position as is the fixed cartridge. If wads do not fit tightly then jarring or movement of the firearm can cause wads to move forward. If the shotgun is fired with the wad and shot column (or part of it) off the powder charge, or the ramrod is still in the bore, the wadding or the ramrod may act as a bore obstruction. THIS CAN CAUSE A RUPTURED OR BURST BARREL RESULTING IN POSSIBLE INJURY AND/OR DEATH TO THE SHOOTER OR BYSTANDERS AND DAMAGE TO PROPERTY. Mark the ramrod as directed and always use the ramrod to check that the charge is properly seated before priming and firing the shotgun. If, due to fouling, a charge of shot becomes lodged part way down the barrel, the shotgun must be disassembled and the charge removed. See section on "Cleaning". Also see section on "Pulling a Charge".

Priming Your Charged Muzzleloading Shotgun. If you have followed the preceding instructions, your muzzleloading shotgun will now be charged with FFG Black Powder or RS Pyrodex and the wads and shot charge will be firmly seated against the powder charge as illustrated on page 69. Your ramrod will be marked to the exact seating depth ensuring that all following charges are seated in the same careful manner. The hammer on your firearm will be in half-cock position.

Do not prime the firearm until you are actually ready to fire and you have double checked to ensure that the ramrod has been removed from the bore. Thompson/Center does not recommend priming the shotgun until the instant before actual firing. Carrying a charged primed firearm and relying upon the half-cock notch to act as a safety can be dangerous. Accidental discharge is a constant hazard which, if it occurs, can cause injury and/or death to The shooter or bystanders and damage to property. The only safe way to guard against an accidental discharge is to carry the shotgun unprimed with the hammer on half-cock and the muzzle pointed downrange away from yourself, bystanders or property.

WHEN YOU ARE READY TO FIRE THE CAP LOCK MUZZLELOAD-ING SHOTGUN, PRIME THE FIREARM AS SHOWN IN PHOTO "G".

Keep Handgun Pointed Down Range

Muzzle pointed down range, keep fingers away from trigger. Use No.11 percussion cap and press it firmly down onto the nipple

With the striker in the "cocked" position and the safety engaged (fully rearward) hold the System 1™ shotgun firmly with the muzzle pointed in a safe direction and pull the hammer to full-cock position. Press the No. 11 Percussion Cap down tightly onto the nipple and the firearm is ready to fire. RAISE THE SHOTGUN AND FIRE THE SHOT!

When firing, hold the shotgun tightly against the shoulder, allowing your body weight to absorb and buffer the force of recoil. HELD IMPROPERLY, A FIREARM CAN "KICK" CAUSING FACIAL INJURY AND/OR BRUISING.

If you decide not to fire, remove the cap from the nipple using a suitable decapping tool like T/C's Decapper.

If the shotgun is no longer going to be used, uncharge it by firing it into a suitable backstop or pull the charge before returning it to your vehicle, camp or home (See section on "Pulling a charge.") AN ACCIDENTAL DISCHARGE MAY CAUSE INJURY AND/OR DEATH TO THE SHOOTER OR BYSTANDERS AND DAMAGE TO PROPERTY.

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